More Than a Flourish: Cursive Handwriting and Your Child’s Brain

Many years ago students had to put quill to paper in order to produce essays.  Letters were made with beautiful flourishes, and children were cautioned to be careful not to drip their ink on their work. 

We’ve come a long way from those days.

Today, educators debate about whether to teach children how to write in cursive.  Many people think that cursive handwriting is unnecessary and old-fashioned.  It isn’t even required in the Core Curriculum standards.

So, what are the benefits of learning cursive?  The first - and, perhaps, most important - is that it sparks higher cognitive development.  Cursive and printed handwriting access different parts of the brain.  Cursive handwriting stimulates the connection between the brain’s two hemispheres: the right hemisphere (often thought to house more creative processes) and the left (the more “logical” side).  Cursive handwriting also activates the brain’s “reading circuit,” so that reading comprehension and concept retention are improved.  Printing, typing, and keyboarding don’t activate and stimulate the brain in these ways.

Studies have shown that more ideas are expressed when a child is writing in cursive than when printing or typing - and that cursive leads to improved skills like planning, ideation, punctuation, grammar, and even better test results.

And, amazingly, cursive actually improves children’s self-esteem.  The simple exercise of writing a letter in cursive wakes up the limbic area of the brain, which is the area that promotes self-esteem and filters information for emotional relationships.  A child who practices cursive will feel better about him/herself and will tend to behave in a more adult-like way.

Cursive is more than just handwritten flourishes — it’s a beneficial and important skill for your child’s cognitive development!  Call us at Tutored Talent to find out more and how to help your child succeed.

Some recommended reading:

Berninger, V. “Evidence-Based, Developmentally Appropriate Writing Skills K-5:  Teaching the Orthographic Loop of Working Memory to Write Letters os Developing Writers Can Spell Words and Express Ideas.”  Presented at Handwriting in the 21st Century?” An Educational Summit, Washington D.C., January 23, 2012.

Doverspike, J. “Ten Reasons People Still Need Cursive.” The Federalist.com, February 25, 2015.  http://thefederalist.com/2015/02/25/ten-reasons-people-still-need-cursive.

“In the States.” 2011.  Common Core State Standards Initiative.  http://www.corestandards.org/in-the-states

Klemm, W.R.. “Why Writing by Hand Could Make You Smarter.” Psychology Today, Mar. 14, 2013. https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/mermory-medic/201303/why-writing-hand-could-make-you-smarter.

Rosenblaum, S., Weiss, P., and Parush, S. 2003. “Product and Process Evaluation of Handwriting Difficulties.” Educational Psychology Review, 15:1, pp. 41-42.

Saperstein Associates. “Handwriting in the 21st Century? Research Shows Why Handwriting Belongs in Today’s Classroom.”  A White Paper presented at An Educational Summit, Washington D.C., January 23, 2012.

Steimetz, K. “Five Reasons Kids Should Still Learn Cursive Writing.” Time Living Education, June 4, 2014. http://time.com/2820780/five-reasons-kids-should-still-learn-cursive-writing/

Sortino, D. “Brain Research and Cursive Writing.” The Press Democrat, May 22,2013. http://davidsortino.blogs.pressdemocrat.com/10221/brain-research-and-cursive-writing/

Zubrzlycki, J. “Summit to Make a Case for Teaching Handwriting. “Education Week, Jan. 23, 2012. http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2012/01/25/18handwriting_ep.h.31.html?qs=cursive

Tutoring and Test Preparation: Making A Rainbow

Tests are a part of every child's school life.  When I was a child in elementary school (so many years ago!), we took tests A LOT:  There were the usual Friday spelling tests and math quizzes, of course.  Then there were "Weekly Reader" tests in all our subject areas, plus Scholastic Reading Lab tests to progress to the next reading level.  I was very competitive with the spelling and math tests because they were public.  The Scholastic Reading Lab tests were my favorite because we were able to use a special color pencil to fill in a graph with the results.  By the mid-year point my graph looked like it had the potential to be a magnificent rainbow.

Each successive test’s results simply reinforced the picture of potential in my head.  Not everyone has the good fortune to have the opportunity to make their test results into rainbows, but we should.

We're coming up to towards the end of the school year.  This is the season of tests, and it should be a time to think of potential.  This shouldn’t be “stress” time for any of our children. Testing is an organized way to find out what a child knows and how well the child can navigate a test maker’s intention.  Some children are nonchalant about testing events, almost uncaring. Others take on the attitudes of the adults surrounding them during the testing season.  Often these adults are nervous about the test results because the adults attach their own personal accomplishment to the child’s testing outcomes.  

At Karin Diskin, we teach strategies specially tailored to each child.  For the child who appears nonchalant, we help them to learn techniques to use their energy wisely to accomplish their best at the moment of the test.  For the child who gets stressed out just thinking about testing, we teach testing strategies to lessen that anxiety.  For both types of children, the strategies are ones that they can pull out and use throughout their academic career.  

We are all confronted with many tests throughout our academic and work careers - life itself can be one big test sometimes.  Using positive strategies for these events helps to boost confidence and self-assurance, makes for better results, and helps your child to address all the "tests" in their life head on, without fear.  

Here’s an easy tip that I share with all of my students for reading tests:

Scan the questions BEFORE reading the passage or excerpt.  This helps give you the flavor of the test maker’s intent..  It also allows you to work through the passage with confidence because you won’t feel surprised by the questions at the end of the “read.”  

I always tell my students “use what you already know.”  Scanning the questions first helps you to “already know” what the test maker wants from you.  When it comes time to answer the questions, read the question again to make sure that you’ve read it completely.   Then you can be in charge of yourself rather than the test taking charge of you.

Here at Karin Diskin, we have many more strategies for successful test taking.  Call us here in Los Angeles at 310-909-4387 and schedule in-home or online tutoring sessions for test preparation and test-taking strategies.